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Arizona Customer Rights – Slamming & Cramming

The Arizona Corporation Commission has established rules concerning Customer rights regarding unauthorized changes of telecommunications carriers (“slamming”), and unauthorized telecommunication charges (“cramming”). These rules assure Customers of certain rights and describe certain steps Customers may take to remedy these problems.

Slamming – Customer Rights
  • A telecommunications carrier is prohibited from changing a Customer’s telecommunications services from one carrier to another without the Customer’s permission.
  • An unauthorized telecommunications carrier that has slammed a Customer is required to pay all charges associated with returning the Customer to the Customer’s original telecommunications carrier, and must do so as promptly as reasonably possible, but in no event later than 30 business days from the Customer’s request for correction.
  • The unauthorized carrier shall absolve the Customer of all unpaid charges, which were incurred during the first 90 days of service provided by the unauthorized carrier.
  • If the Customer incurred charges for service provided during the first 90 days of service from the unauthorized carrier, the unauthorized carrier must forward the relevant billing information to the Customer’s original telecommunications carrier. The original carrier may not bill the Customer for the unauthorized service charges for the first 90 days of the unauthorized service, but may thereafter bill the Customer at the original carrier’s rates.
  • If the Customer has paid charges to the unauthorized carrier, that carrier must pay 100% of those charges to the original telecommunications carrier and the original carrier must then apply 100% of that payment as credit towards the Customer’s authorized charges.
Cramming – Customer Rights
  • Telecommunications carriers are prohibited from adding any products and/or services to a Customer’s account without the Customer’s authorization.
  • The telecommunications carrier must return the Customer’s service to its original service configuration if an unauthorized charge is added to a Customer’s account.
  • The telecommunications carrier cannot charge for returning the Customer to their original service configuration.
  • The telecommunications carrier must refund or credit, at the Customer’s option, any amount paid for any unauthorized charge. If any unauthorized charge is not refunded or credited within two billing cycles, the carrier must pay interest on the amount of any unauthorized charges, at an annual rate established by the Commission, until the unauthorized charges are refunded or credited.

Customer Responsibilities – You, the Customer:

  • Are advised to contact Integra Telecom immediately if you feel you have been “slammed” or “crammed”.
  • If you have been slammed, Integra recommends that you contact the unauthorized carrier to demand that your service be changed back to your preferred carrier in accordance with Arizona Corporation Commission Rules.
  • Integra offers its Customers the option of placing a freeze on the your long distance telecommunications service account. This means that long distance carriers that attempt to switch your long distance service must first have your authorization before doing so.

To contact Integra, please visit the contact page for your market. If Integra cannot resolve an unauthorized carrier change or unauthorized telephone charges, you may report the incident to the Arizona Corporation Commission at the following address, telephone numbers or website: http://www.cc.state.az.us/consumer/index.htm.

By mail to:

Arizona Corporation Commission
Consumer Services Section
1200 W. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85007

By phone:

Within the Phoenix Metro area: (602) 542-4251
Within the Tucson Metro area: (520) 628-6550
Outside the Phoenix or Tucson Metro areas, but within Arizona,call toll free:
1-(800) 222-7000 for the Phoenix Office
1-(800) 535-0148 for the Tucson Office

Updated on June 10, 2016

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